Through the remedial lens: The curious case of unilateral declaration of secession 

Arkaprava Dass, Adnan Yousuf* In October 2019, dissident political leaders from the state of Manipur in India unilaterally declared independence from the country fearing the extinction of their culture and destruction of history. They further called for the de jure recognition of their government by the United Nations in London. In light of this incident, … Continue reading Through the remedial lens: The curious case of unilateral declaration of secession 

UN official’s full speech, where she urged India to respect human rights in Kashmir and Assam

Text of the controversial opening statement by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet in Geneva on September 9, where the top UN official made controversial remarks on Kashmir and Assam: A year has gone by since I began my mandate.  I won´t lie to you, it has not been an easy task.  We … Continue reading UN official’s full speech, where she urged India to respect human rights in Kashmir and Assam

Why ‘unemployable’ disabled people face exclusion, have been deliberately shut out of labour force

By Sheshu Babu* Since the major aim of capitalists is to see that maximum production can be extracted from labour, exploitation of workers becomes a key factor. Ordinary workers, thus, face constant harassment, humiliation, misery and burden of work. Disabled, in addition, face alienation and abuse both from the employers as well as society. The … Continue reading Why ‘unemployable’ disabled people face exclusion, have been deliberately shut out of labour force

Discrimination against disabled community is very much official, is ingrained in veins of society

By Arosis Sahoo* Recently, I was browsing through a bunch of articles when one headline in “The New York Times” caught my attention. It read, “How to disclose a disability to your employer (and whether you should?)”. My first response was to ignore it on the grounds of being ignorant and inconsiderate. A closer introspection, though, … Continue reading Discrimination against disabled community is very much official, is ingrained in veins of society

Has fasting in India remained effective enough to prompt the country’s governments to act?

By Niril Panigrahi* In my first lecture of the ‘Transformational Social Movements’ class at the Indian Institute of Management (IIM)-Ahmedabad, Dr Sandeep Pandey recounted the story of the professor who died after days of fasting against the alleged governmental nonchalance to protect Ganga. Indian Institute of Technology (IIT)-Kanpur Professor turned Activist G.D. Aggarwal succumbed to … Continue reading Has fasting in India remained effective enough to prompt the country’s governments to act?

The fear of the crowd: Why does authority really dislike people coming together?

By Utsav Mistry* Throughout history, whether human or animal, the coming together of more than one individual to achieve objectives has been well documented. Even when early humans lived the hunter gatherer life, forming groups was essential to their survival. But the arrival of civilisation doesn't mean our primal instincts go away. For the duration … Continue reading The fear of the crowd: Why does authority really dislike people coming together?

Why denotified tribes, criminalised by British, remain unrepresented at the national level

By Aravindha Raj R* Denotified Tribes (DNTs) are the tribes which were listed by British under the Criminal Tribes Act of 1871 which notified certain tribes as "criminals," regardless of the activities of individual members. The DNTs being a nomadic group have remained outside the Indian constitution and have not received any constitution rights and welfare activities. The Criminals … Continue reading Why denotified tribes, criminalised by British, remain unrepresented at the national level